The International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) has published dozens of research studies and treatment guidelines on multiple myeloma and its related disorders. The following are a sample of the International Myeloma Working Group’s ranging publication topics:

  • Genetic predisposition for chemotherapy-induced neuropathy in multiple myeloma
  • Gene signature combinations improve prognostic stratification of multiple myeloma patients
  • Treatment of multiple myeloma with high-risk cytogenetics: a consensus of the International Myeloma Working Group
  • Natural history of relapsed myeloma, refractory to immunomodulatory drugs and proteasome inhibitors: A multicenter IMWG study
  • Combining Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (iFISH) data with ISS staging improves risk assessment in myeloma: an International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) collaborative project

From doctors to patients, the goal of these publications is to help anyone better understand aspects of myeloma. The information provided in the International Myeloma Working Group’s publications seeks to help guide patients and their doctors to treating myeloma in the most effective way for every individual case.





Recent advances in the treatment of multiple myeloma have increased the need for accurate diagnosis of the disease. The detection of bone and bone marrow lesions is crucial in the investigation of multiple myeloma and often dictates the decision to start treatment. Furthermore, detection of minimal residual disease is important for prognosis determination and treatment planning, and it has underscored an unmet need for sensitive imaging methods that accurately assess patient response to multiple myeloma treatment.






Multiple myeloma (MM) represents approximately 15% of haematological malignancies and most of the patients present with bone involvement. Focal or diffuse spinal osteolysis may result in significant morbidity by causing painful progressive vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) and deformities. Advances in the systemic treatment of myeloma have achieved high response rates and prolonged the survival significantly. Early diagnosis and management of skeletal events contribute to improving the prognosis and quality of life of MM patients. The management of patients with significant pain due to VCFs in the acute phase is not standardised.






PURPOSE:
multiple myeloma is considered an incurable hematologic cancer but a subset of patients can achieve long-term remissions and survival. The present study examines the clinical features of long-term survival as it correlates to depth of disease response.






This study explores the available drugs, health care systems, coverage of new agents, old drugs, and more in Latin American Countries.


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