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Bank On A Cure® is the first global myeloma-specific DNA bank and research initiative. Building on the momentum created by the mapping of the human genome, Bank On A Cure scientists are poring over the vast bank of genetic information the IMF has gathered from myeloma patients worldwide to determine the genetic factors common to all of them. By discovering these patterns, we will be able to develop and tailor better treatment options, minimize the adverse side effects of medications, unlock the mysteries of what causes myeloma, and – ultimately – find a cure.

BANK ON A CURE UPDATES
05.16.10  Developing a SNP Classifier for Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy by Bortezomib in Multiple Myeloma Patients
The prevalence of peripheral neuropathy (PNP) during the treatment of MM with Bortezomib is high.

About 20% of patients develop a grade 3-4 PNP due to this treatment, and as a result Bortezomib treatment is stopped or a reduced dose is given. Therefore, there is a strong need to find markers which predict the susceptibility of a patient to develop Bortezomib related PNP.

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05.16.10  Genetic Associations with Bortezomib Mediated Neuropathy in Multiple Myeloma

The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib has demonstrated high antitumor activity in multiple myeloma (MM). Peripheral neuropathy (PNP) is a doselimiting toxicity of bortezomib, which typically occurs within the first cycles of bortezomib in 30-40% of MM patients. Although bortezomib induced PNP is manageable and reversible in most MM patients, no effective prophylactic treatment against PNP is available and bortezomib discontinuation is frequently required. Identifying patients at risk of neuropathy and understanding its pathogenesis is therefore of great importance.

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05.16.10  Genetic Associations with Therapy Response in the HOVON-65/GMMG-HD4 Trial in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a plasma cell malignancy, characterized by significant heterogeneous disease progression and response to therapy. It is very likely that genetic polymorphisms of genes involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion may affect a patient’s response to therapy.

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05.16.10  Genetic Variations Associated with Overall and Progression-Free Survival in Multiple Myeloma Patients Treated with Thalidomide Combinations

It is anticipated that inherited single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes involved in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion influence individual response to thalidomide therapies in Multiple Myeloma. We extracted peripheral blood DNA from 631 myeloma patients of European descent enrolled in the MRC Myeloma IX trial who had received induction thalidomide (50-200mg). We genotyped 3404 SNPs selected in 983 candidate genes that may influence myeloma disease response, toxicity, and/or survival, on a “Bank on a Cure” (BOAC) Affymetrix® true-tag array.

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05.16.10  Genomic variation in myeloma: design, content, and initial application of the Bank On A Cure SNP Panel to detect associations with progression-free survival

We have engaged in an international program designated the Bank On A Cure, which has established DNA banks from multiple cooperative and institutional clinical trials, and a platform for examining the association of genetic variations with disease risk and outcomes in multiple myeloma.

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12.02.09  Bank On A Cure® at ASH 2008
Drs. Van Ness and Morgan presented Bank On A Cure® findings relating single nucleotide polymorphisms to long term survival and neuropathy

12.11.07  THE INTERNATIONAL MYELOMA FOUNDATION IDENTIFIES POTENTIAL LINK BETWEEN GENETIC PATHWAYS AND ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS FOR MYELOMA
BANK ON A CURE® DNA Data Base also finds Genetic Link to Bone Disease and Indications for Treatment
05.08.07  Bank On A Cure® 2007 Update From Dr. Brian Durie
Myeloma Today in conversation with Dr. Brian Durie (PDF)

12.11.06  BANK ON A CURE® "GENE BANK" RESEARCHERS IDENTIFY PATHWAYS THAT MEDIATE SIDE EFFECTS FROM WIDELY-USED MYELOMA TREATMENT
Findings Explain Why Certain Patients Suffer Blood Clots from Thalidomide; and Why Aspirin Works as an Intervention
07.18.06  Partnership for Cure's Concert for Cures Nets $25,000 for Bank® On A Cure
Dr. Brian Van Ness was on hand to accept the check.

05.17.05  Past Updates from Bank On A Cure®
07.15.06  Progress Report: Bank On A Cure® Research Initiative
The goal of Bank On A Cure is to collect DNA samples from at least 10,000 participants. Processing and analyzing this data will yield important clues about each individual person's response to treatment and susceptibility to toxic side effects. This will help researchers gain a greater understanding of how myeloma drugs work, and how they can be improved. Bank On A Cure data will also provide vital insights into the causes of myeloma, and, ultimately, will lead to its prevention and a cure.