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SUPPORTIVE CARE

Supportive care is directed toward managing side effects of the disease and treatment but is not anti-myeloma therapy.

ASH 2011 presentations that address STEP 4

REFERENCES

STEP 4: SUPPORTIVE CARE AND HOW TO GET IT

Bone Disease
Multiple myeloma is characterized by a unique form of destructive bone disease which occurs in the majority of patients. The bone destruction, which is progressive, is responsible for the most prominent and distressing clinical features of this disease, namely intractable bone pain, fractures occurring either spontaneously or following trivial injury, and hypercalcemia with its attendant symptoms and signs.

Management of Side Effects of Novel Therapies
Written by the IMF Nurse Leadership Board, made up of experienced specialty oncology nurses, these are the first comprehensive guidelines for managing side effects from lenalidomide, thalidomide, and bortezomib used in the treatment of multiple myeloma.

Nutrition
According to the National Cancer Institute, "healthy eating habits and good nutrition can help patients deal with the effects of cancer and its treatment. Some cancer treatments work better when the patient is well nourished and gets enough calories and protein in the diet. Patients who are well nourished may have a better prognosis (chance of recovery) and quality of life."

Anemia and Fatigue

Learn about what you can do and which medications are available to help you better manage your fatigue and enable you to feel better and participate in more activities.


Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not generally considered part of conventional medicine.