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Understanding Bisphosphonate Therapy
Approximately 80% of all patients with myeloma develop bone disease. Bone disease can cause the bones to become thinner and weaker (osteoporosis), and it can make holes appear in the bone (lytic lesions). In addition to bone disease, myeloma patients may develop a condition called hypercalcemia. Both myeloma bone disease and hypercalcemia can be treated with a group of drugs called bisphosphonates.
03.22.13
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Note: People taking bisphophonates should read the special advisory on a potential complication of bisphosphonate therapy.

Approximately 80% of all patients with myeloma develop bone disease. Bone disease can cause the bones to become thinner and weaker (osteoporosis), and it can make holes appear in the bone (lytic lesions). The weakened bone that results is more likely to break under minor pressure or injury (pathologic fracture). The bones most commonly affected are the axial skeleton (spine, pelvis, ribs, and skull) and the upper ends of the long bones of the arms and legs. Myeloma cells cause bone disease by sending signals to certain bone cells called osteoclasts, causing them to break down bone. In addition to giving rise to bone disease, this process also releases calcium; if this release happens too quickly, a condition called hypercalcemia can occur. Both myeloma bone disease and hypercalcemia can be treated with a group of drugs called bisphosphonates.


 related articles
Understanding Bisphosphonate Therapy
IMWG Guidelines for the Use of Bisphosphonates in Myeloma
International Myeloma Workshop 2011
PRACTICAL ASPECTS ON THE MANAGEMENT OF MYELOMA BONE DISEASE
Dr. Gimsing - Bisphosphonates: Can the Dose be Lowered?
Use of Bisphosphonates in Multiple Myeloma: IMWG Response to Mayo Clinic Consensus Statement
Aredia/Zometa and osteonecrosis of the jaws
Salvatore L. Ruggiero, DMD, MD Talks About Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ)
Osteonecrosis of the Jaw and Bisphosphonates
Bisphosphonates For Myeloma - Current Approach To Treatment
Bone Metabolism, Bone Disease, and the Bisphosphonates
HealthTalk Bone Disease Webcast


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Understanding Bisphosphonate Therapy
Approximately 80% of all patients with myeloma develop bone disease. Bone disease can cause the bones to become thinner and weaker (osteoporosis), and it can make holes appear in the bone (lytic lesions). In addition to bone disease, myeloma patients may develop a condition called hypercalcemia. Both myeloma bone disease and hypercalcemia can be treated with a group of drugs called bisphosphonates.

IMWG Guidelines for the Use of Bisphosphonates in Myeloma

International Myeloma Workshop 2011
PRACTICAL ASPECTS ON THE MANAGEMENT OF MYELOMA BONE DISEASE
Dr. Gimsing - Bisphosphonates: Can the Dose be Lowered?
Peter Gimsing, MD
Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University
Copenhagen, Denmark
May 3-6, 2011
Paris, France

Use of Bisphosphonates in Multiple Myeloma: IMWG Response to Mayo Clinic Consensus Statement

Aredia/Zometa and osteonecrosis of the jaws

Salvatore L. Ruggiero, DMD, MD Talks About Osteonecrosis of the Jaw (ONJ)

Osteonecrosis of the Jaw and Bisphosphonates

Bisphosphonates For Myeloma - Current Approach To Treatment
An overview by IMF Scientific Advisor Phil Greipp

Bone Metabolism, Bone Disease, and the Bisphosphonates
An excellent overview by IMF Scientific Advisor Greg Mundy and Babatunde O. Oyajobi, MB, ChB, PhD

HealthTalk Bone Disease Webcast
IMFer Mike Katz and Dr. Paul Richardson discuss myeloma bone disease