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Dr. Greg Mundy, passed away on February 25th, 2010, after a valiant battle with brain cancer
Dr. Mundy devoted his life to groundbreaking research in bone metabolism, including many important issues concerning myeloma bone disease. Greg was a longtime member of the IMF's Board of Directors and Scientific Advisory Board.
03.01.10

Dear Friends,

We are sad to report that a great friend of the IMF and myeloma patients all over the world, Dr. Greg Mundy, passed away on February 25th, 2010, after a valiant battle with brain cancer. Dr. Mundy devoted his life to groundbreaking research in bone metabolism, including many important issues concerning myeloma bone disease.

Greg was a longtime member of the IMF's Board of Directors and Scientific Advisory Board. His energy and good humor were legendary, as was his pragmatic view of the world and his ability to develop approaches to what seemed to be insurmountable issues.

We are stunned and saddened by this loss. We are grateful for his lifetime of service to the patient community, for his friendship and support. Our heartfelt condolences and love go to Greg's family. We have lost a wonderful friend and colleague.

Michael Katz, on behalf of the IMF Board of Directors

Below is a message from William L. Henrich, M.D., MACP of the University Of Texas Health Science Center


Dear Faculty and Staff:

It is with great sadness that I inform you of the death of Gregory R. Mundy, M.D., Thursday, Feb. 25, at his home in San Antonio after a long illness.

Dr. Mundy worked at the Health Science Center from 1980 through 2006 and was a professor in the Department of Medicine and Department of Cellular & Structural Biology, assistant dean for Clinical Research and principal investigator of the Frederic C. Bartter Clinical Research Unit, as well as interim director of the San Antonio Cancer Institute.

He left to become director of the Vanderbilt Center in Bone Biology, the John A. Oates Chair in Translational Medicine and professor of Medicine, Pharmacology, Orthopedics and Cancer Biology.

While at the Health Science Center, Dr. Mundy had numerous breakthroughs with his research involving drugs to slow bone loss and promote bone growth in patients with osteoporosis. He also conducted NIH-supported research on the effects of tumors on the skeleton. He was the first in the nation to receive a coveted MERIT award from the National Institutes of Health in the field of bone and mineral metabolism.

Dr. Mundy was in the upper 2 percent of all NIH awardees for his many years of ground-breaking research. He published over 540 papers in the per-reviewed literature and was the author of 34 patents. He also was very successful in translating scientific discoveries into the public sector through OsteoScreen, a company formed in collaboration with the UT health Science Center.

Dr. Mundy received numerous honors and awards, among them the Fuller Albright Award of the American Society of Bone & Mineral Research in 1982 and an NIH Merit Award in 1986. He received the William F. Neuman Award of the American Society for Bone & Mineral Research and the Presidential Distinguished Senior Research Scholar Award that he shared with Bettie Sue Masters, Ph.D. in 1999. He also held many professional leadership positions including president of the International Bone and Mineral Society, president of the American Society for Bone & Mineral Research and chair of the Research Grants Committee of the National Osteoporosis Foundation. He was one of three founders of the Cancer and Bone Society and served on the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal Disorders Advisory Council.

Dr. Mundy is survived by his wife, Helen, his three children, Gavin, Ben and Jennifer, and his sister, Jan Tarrant. He will be fondly remembered by his many friends and colleagues here at the UT health Science Center and around the globe.

Please join me in comforting his family at this time.

Sincerely,

William L. Henrich, M.D., MACP


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